Monthly Archive: June 2014

I’ve mentioned earlier that I am looking for a home to buy, and have heard some readers share their opinions about how a permanent residence is a bad investment.

Buying a home as an “Investment” brings out a lot of heated argument in the investing world. There are typically two schools of thought. Many people believe that paying rent is wasted money that could potentially be building equity. Why subject yourself to a continuous expense to have nothing to show for it, right? Well, the folks on the other side of the table see it differently. Owning a home means you are liable for all repairs and maintenance, additionally it means you’re tied down to living in the same place.

Personally, I think both views are too rigid which have major flaws in their logic. You do gain value from the money you pay each month in the form of having the service of someone else handling the maintenance issues. So saying that the money is wasted is a little extreme.

In regards to flexibility, it is true that needing to sell your house before you move is more complicated than moving out of an apartment. However, people often forget about the fact that renters typically have a 1 year lease with expensive penalties for leaving early. Additionally, when it comes time to renew that lease, the tenant usually needs to commit to the next term months before the current lease is even up. So if you want to move without penalty, you need to know you’re moving months ahead of time and can only move in that short window as the lease is ending. I really think the flexibility argument is pretty weak on both sides.

I’m curious to hear from the people who say that a residence is a liability instead of an investment and what they think of owning rental properties. With a rental property, you still have all of the problems of a residential home like maintenance but with the added complication that you could have a crappy tenant that doesn’t respect the home. I think people also tend to forget that you need a place to live just the same as you need food and oxygen.

Owning a home is like owning a rental property where you are the tenant. If you rented out a rental property to a tenant, and then rented your residence from someone else, you’re basically breaking even, assuming they rent for the same price. So at that point, you’re really just taking on additional risk by involving a 3rd party as the tenant.

That’s just my 2 cents, what do you think?

P.S. – The home in the photo is one we’re buying next month! We’re very excited.

Somehow, the time of the month for this exercise always sneaks up on me. We’re now looking at the returns after 4 months.

The purpose of this exercise is to compare a focused approach to investing in quality dividend paying companies to using a fund of cherry picked stocks selected by experts. At the time I started this comparison, Kfund1 was composed of my personal holdings in MCD, MSFT, MRK, WMT, JNJ, and LMT, all of which are also part of the Vanguard Dividend Growth Fund (VDIGX). KFund2 was composed of my personal holdings in PEP, PG, WMT, KO, XOM, CVX, MCD, and MMM, all of which are also part of the Vanguard Dividend Appreciation Index Fund (VDAIX).

Below are the 2 Vanguard dividend funds I have and the change in value they have seen in the past 3 months.

VDIGX
up 6.40% (last month 5.78%)

VDAIX
up 6.75% (last month 6.17%)

Gains seem to have slowed down a tad, but what’s important to note here is that the returns are still up from last month.

Now let’s see how the individual companies that I own did in that time.

KFund1
up 6.66% (last month 7.20%)

KFund2
up 7.69% (last month 8.86%)

So my individual holdings actually went down in value compared to last month, which is unfortunate. However, if we’re still just comparing returns, the individual holdings are still ahead. These results do not surprise me as funds are intended to minimize risk. The asset management probably attributed to the continued gains during a down month, but at the cost of overall high-end returns. Like Warren Buffet, I consider myself an optimist when it comes to American business. While we all like to avoid losses, in the long run the market will continue to rise. This is why avoiding risk is not a priority for me while investing in big established businesses with proven performance and a track record of continuously rewarding shareholders.

The dividend growth investor loves to see high quality businesses trading at a discount. The problem is that the “good deals” are hard to find these days. The overall market is up, real estate is recovering, and nobody seems to be flailing their arms and desperately selling their shares. Times are good, but that means opportunity is limited.

If we turn the clock back to 2011 or 2008, great deals on dividend stocks were easy to find because there was panic in the streets. Stock prices were falling, which created more panicked selling which lead to even lower prices. If you weren’t viewing stocks as dividend engines, you’d be freaking out that your portfolio was plummeting. These were huge opportunities for dividend investors to pick up some great deals.

I had not found my strategy yet when those price dips came around. So now, I’m hoping for another chance to get in on the ground floor. I’m hoping, people panic.